"It's not just deals," said Nicole Jue, senior creative program manager. "This year, it's about the experience this Prime Day can get you—it can enable you to set up your outdoor area like an oasis or set up the kitchen you always wanted. It's that emotional connection that this Prime Day deal got you."

Boxy debuted in 2015 for Amazon's first Prime Day—a human form of boxes promising Prime customers more deals than Black Friday. Then came Boxtropolis, a city of cardboard, animated to bring Prime Day's "parade of deals" to life.

This year, we're packing up Boxtropolis and celebrating the energy and excitement of Prime Day with real people to capture the emotion and joy of the two-day event.

Still from an Amazon Prime Day advertisement
A still from Amazon Prime Day 2015 ad, featuring "Boxy"
Still from an Amazon Prime Day advertisement
Image from Amazon's Prime Day "Boxtropolis"
Still from an Amazon Prime Day advertisement
Amazon 2021 Prime Day image

"As the world is beginning to emerge from a pandemic," said Group Creative Director Colin Gaul, "people are looking for a change, and embracing the excitement that comes along with that."

How and why Prime Day came to be, and the impact and scale for customers, small businesses, and sellers on Amazon.

"This year's campaign is truly a celebration of our customers and the relationship we have with them," said Gaul.

This year, Prime Day is in 20 countries, including countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and South America and the ads are designed to represent millions of customers across different races, ethnicities, ages, gender identities, sexual orientations, religious and spiritual beliefs, abilities, and body shapes and sizes.